iOS

Can Everything Be Discoverable?

There are good arguments to be made that Apple hasn’t always helped the iPad live up to its promise. Certainly John Gruber thinks so, as evidenced by both the title and body of his recent post, The iPad Awkwardly Turns 10.

My issue with what he wrote is not his claim that iPad multitasking is fiddly and unintuitive and a bit incoherent and inconsistent. It is. And it’s not his assertion that iPad multitasking is non-discoverable:

How would anyone ever figure out how to split-screen multitask on the iPad if they didn’t already know how to do it?

I can’t really disagree with that. It’s just that I don’t know how much that does or should matter.

Not everything in technology can be intuitive. Sometimes things have to be learned. And some of the people complaining about the fact that all iPadOS features don’t present themselves as fully-formed concepts directly into the user’s brain upon iPad unlock are people who created Markdown, or who are iOS programmers, or who use Photoshop, or who have elaborate writing workflows.

None of those …

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 MacStories Shortcuts Icons 

This might fall into the frivolous category for a lot of people, but I make a lot of home screen icons for shortcuts I use frequently, so I enjoy the MacStories Shortcuts Icons tremendously.

I’ll even admit to going a little nutty and replacing several of my app icons on my iPhone home screen with them, using them as app launchers rather than icons for shortcuts, but that’s another story. I wouldn’t recommend that for most people, as it makes opening an app into a bounce-through-shortcuts experience.

Still, it’s fun to experiment with alternate looks that Apple won’t give us.

But if you create lots of shortcuts and put icon shortcuts to your actual shortcuts (whew!) on your home screen, these will help give personality to them as well as make them easily and quickly identifiable for you.

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Shortcuts for Blog Posting – Taxonomies

As someone who does a lot of work on the iPad, I have always wanted to be able to create efficient workflows for posting things to my various sites. This being a site that I own, it’s no exception.

One downside to moving the site from Wordpress to Hugo is that posting is basically a matter of putting the article content into a specific part of a markdown template, putting category and tag information into their designated part of the template, moving the edited file to the desired location for the post to appear, and recompiling the site with the “hugo” command.

I already knew I was going to make a shortcut to handle posting to the site for me, for the sake of ease and consistency. The beauty of automation is you never fat-finger a template edit and wind up having to fix something later when you notice. Also, …

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Working Copy WebDAV Server

I’m an avid user of Working Copy, the brilliant iOS Git client from Anders Borum. Apparently I still have a few things to learn about it though, as I discovered while listening to Episode 71 of the excellent iPad Pros podcast.

It turns out that in order to solve the problem of being able to browse and work with Working Copy repos from directly within Panic Code Editor (another iOS app that I use every day), Anders bestowed upon Working Copy a built-in WebDAV server. Fire it up, create a server entry in Code Editor pointing to the WebDAV server IP, and get to work.

The best case scenario is that when Panic updates the app, they allow direct access through Files app integration, since Working Copy can act as a Files location provider, but in the meantime, this solution works pretty well.

Panic Code Editor

I have a few apps on my iPad I consider workhorses, and certainly one of those is Code Editor from Panic.

Code Editor is kind of a 3-in-1 tool for working on websites:

  • SSH client,
  • FTP client,
  • Text editor.

This is the perfect set of features for me for working with Hugo sites because I need to move files around (FTP), edit files (text editor), and compile the site to see my changes (SSH client).

Furthermore, I often use each of these features individually to do some quick task. The FTP functionality alone is pretty valuable ever since Panic discontinued their Transmit FTP app on iOS.

Code Editor is not perfect, however. I’m not going to say I’m hesitant to recommend it, because I’m not, but there are a couple caveats.

First, it’s not a new app and it will eventually be replaced by a new Panic product called Nova. Right …

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